Charles Warren Eaton

American, 1857 - 1937
A major figure in the American Tonalist movement, Charles Warren Eaton painted evocative landscapes in New Jersey, New England, and Europe. Guided by his desire to convey the underlying moods of nature, he eschewed grandiose vistas in favor of quieter, more intimate views, which he depicted at dawn or dusk.

Born in Albany, New York, Eaton stud-ied at the National Academy of Design and the Art Students League in New York. A trip to Europe in 1886 provided him with the opportunity to study contemporary art. However, the most important influence on his aesthetic was George Inness a painter of poetic land-scapes in the Barbizon mode, whom he met in 1889. Eaton established a summer residence in Bloomfield, New Jersey, in 1887 and spent the next decade depicting the local country-side during the late autumn and winter.

After 1900, he made seasonal visits to Thompson and Colebrook, Connecticut, where he developed his signature themea grove of pine trees silhouetted against sunset or moonlit skies. Eaton was also active in Belgium, Italy, and Glacier Park, Montana.

Biography courtesy of Roughton Galleries, www.antiquesandfineart.com/roughton
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