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Three Ballerinas

Origin United States
Period 1920-1949
Materials Oil Pastel
Dimensions
W. 38.5 in; H. 28.5 in;
W. 97.79 cm; H. 72.39 cm;
Condition Excellent.
Creation Date c. 1940
Description Isaac Soyer (1902-1981) was the youngest of the three Soyer brothers, all artists, the others being Moses and Raphael. All three brothers were proponents of realism in painting, staying with this style even after abstraction became the dominant mode of artistic expression. Like his better-known brothers, Isaac painted in the Social Realist style early on. He is also known for his portraits of ballerinas, such as this work. However, his works tend to have more of an edge than those of his brothers, whether by subject matter or style of composition. For example, his most famed work is "Employment Agency" (1937" which shows the ennui and desperation of unemployed workers waiting for an interview. His brothers tend to portray ballerinas and women in general in poses of languid repose, but in this work the dancers are hard at work practicing their moves.

His works are held by the Whitney, Brooklyn Museum, Albright-Knox Museum and the Dallas Museum among others. This work was exhibited at the Whitney and bears a Whitney label with Soyer's name en verso.
Styles / Movements Ashcan, Post Impressionism, Realism
Incollect Reference Number 254055
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